A Point-of-Care Ultrasound Rotation for Medical Education Fellows in Emergency Medicine  

Alanna O’Connell, DO; Al’ai Alvarez, MD; Peter Tomaselli, MD; Arthur Au, MD; Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD MPH; Resa E. Lewiss, MD – A Medical Education (MedEd) fellowship provides emergency medicine (EM) residency graduates the structured and rigorous training to develop skills as educators. Although not accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), MedEd fellowships have established minimum curriculum standards [1].

Sonographic Crepitus, a Point-of-Care Ultrasound Finding  

Brian Kohen, MD; Michael Halperin, MD MPH; Gloria Felix, MD; Trevor Dixon, MD; Michelle Montenegro, MD; Fenil Patel, MD – Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening polymicrobial skin and soft tissue infection that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. Delays in diagnosis and treatment can result in an increase in morbidity and mortality [1]. Necrotizing fasciitis has historically been a clinical diagnosis. Patients with a high clinical suspicion for necrotizing fasciitis generally receive antibiotics and undergo emergent surgical debridement.

Diagnosing Paget-Schroetter Syndrome Using Point of Care Ultrasound (POCUS)  

Khaled Taha, MD, MSc, MRCP, MRCEM; Tomás Breslin, MD, MRCP, FRCEM; John M. Moriarty, MD, FSIR; Shammy Ali, MBBS, MD; Bernhard Louw, MBChB, DipPEC (SA) – Paget-Schroetter Syndrome, or effort thrombosis, is a relatively rare disorder. It refers to axillary-subclavian vein thrombosis (ASVT) that is associated with strenuous and repetitive activity of the upper extremities [1]. Anatomical abnormalities at the thoracic outlet and repetitive trauma to the endothelium of the subclavian vein are key factors in its initiation and progression. Doppler ultrasonography is the preferred initial test, but contrast venography is the gold standard for diagnosis [1,2].

Point of Care Ultrasound (POCUS) in Bedside Diagnosis of Pyomyositis  

Olusegun Oduyoye, MBBS, MSc, FHEA, FRCPE; Euan Thomas, BSc, MSc
– Pyomyositis is an acute bacterial infection of skeletal muscle that results in localised abscess formation presenting with symptoms, including pain, swelling, erythema, and fever. It is usually associated with tropical climates; however, there has been an increasing number of cases presenting with pyomyositis in patients with a history of intravenous drug use [1-3].

The Takotsubo Syndrome: Clinical Diagnosis Using POCUS  

Josu López Libano, MD; Lorenzo Alomar Lladó, MD; Leire Zarraga López – Takotsubo syndrome is a cardiomyopathy that can mimic an acute heart attack, in terms of clinical presentation, electrocardiographic changes, and findings on echocardiogram. Point-of-care-ultrasound (POCUS) can be used to detect this condition, even though the definitive diagnosis is made angiographically.

Can Medical Students Learn and Perform POCUS in the Pediatric Emergency Department? Implementation of a Short Curriculum  

Michael  C. Cooper, MD; Jodi Jones, MD; Mandy Pascual, MD; Steven Field, DO; Juan M. Rendon, MD; Christine Kulstad, MD; Bryant Dixon, MD; Kristie Pham Tu; Aman Narayan; Hunter Pyle; Khiem Hoang; Anthony Han; Dalbir Bahga MD; Aman Pandey, MD; Lynn Roppolo, MD – Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is used by emergency physicians to make rapid critical diagnoses in the emergency department (ED) [1]. POCUS is now being incorporated into medical student patient assessment curricula [2, 3]. Several studies have demonstrated the feasibility of medical students using POCUS and have included teaching multiple POCUS applications to medical students simultaneously [2,4,5]. However, there are few studies demonstrating medical students’ ability to accurately perform POCUS on pediatric patients and these studies have typically included one POCUS application taught at a time [6-9].

The Beauty of Sound Waves  

Ai Phi Thuy Ho, MD – “The Beauty of Sound Waves” is an artwork representing the anatomy of various organs in the human body that can be detected by ultrasound, either as normal findings or pathology.

About the Special Kidney Issue

Nathaniel Reisinger, MD; Abhilash Koratala, MD – We know what you’re thinking. we’ve heard it a thousand times: “Oh, you’re a kidney doctor who dinks around with ultrasound? What do you look for? Hydronephrosis?” You may be asking, “Is this issue just going to be a bunch of pictures of hydronephrosis and distended bladders?” And yes, for the thousandth time, in acute kidney injury it’s almost never wrong to get a kidney and bladder ultrasound as part of the initial workup.